News & Events

  • Developing their skill at perspective-taking, along with building students’ “sociological imaginations,” a concept described by 20th century sociologist C. Wright Mills, are two of the main objectives of "Introductory Sociology." Along with in-class games and weekly reflections, assignments in Kim Rogers' course ask students to investigate areas where their personal identities overlap with social dynamics.  Read the full story about "Doing Sociology"...

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  • Kalpona Akter, who started stitching at age 12 for $6 a month in a Bangladesh sweat shop, is now, at 40, a global activist for reform in her nation’s garment industry. She related her life trajectory in a series of sometimes emotional talks to Dartmouth College students, faculty and the public.  Read the full story here.

  • Misagh Parsa, a professor of sociology at Dartmouth College, outlined the roots of a deep discord between the Iranian people and their Islamist government and pointed to possible outcomes during a recent talk at the Haldeman Center. The discussion came within days of a convincing victory from Hassan Rouhani, a moderate reformer, in the country’s presidential election and also coincides with the publication of Parsa’s latest book, Democracy in Iran: Why It Failed and How It Might Succeed...

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  • Iranian voters delivered a decisive reelection victory to President Hassan Rouhani, endorsing his efforts to engage with the West and find a peaceful path out of diplomatic isolation.  Sociology Professor Misagh Parsa offers his insights on this development in an article in the Los Angeles Times, which can be read...

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  • In the May 12, 2017 edition (Politics section) of the "Times Literary Supplement," Anthony Forbes reviews six recently published books which assess the different cultural, political, military, social and economic paths along which Iran and its enemies have travelled to arrive at the current state of affairs.

    He says: "Misagh Parsa's brilliantly argued Democracy in Iran posits a new revolutionary future for the country, suggesting that as the gap between ruler and ruled widens...

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  • Hassan Hassen ’18, a sociology major from Marietta, Ga., has been named a Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellow—one of 10 undergraduates from across the country selected by the U.S. State Department-funded program for students from diverse backgrounds who are interested in U.S. Foreign Service careers. Read the full story in Dartmouth News...

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  • Assistant Professor Kimberly Rogers uses the video game Halo in her "Introductory Sociology" course to teach basic concepts of sociology.  Read more about this specific course here and more about our introductory courses in general here.

  • Dartmouth College Assistant Professor Kimberly Rogers, along with colleagues Tobias Schröder and Jesse Hoey, is receiving a second award (the Outstanding Recent Contribution in Social Psychology Award from the Social Psychology Section of the American Sociological Association) for the following paper:

    Schröder, Tobias, Jesse Hoey, and Kimberly B. Rogers. 2016. "Modeling Dynamic Identities and Uncertainty in Social Interactions Bayesian Affect Control Theory." American Sociological...

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  • Online advertisers can already target you based on your age, gender, interests and location. Now, leaked documents suggest Facebook is working on ways to show advertisements based on your emotions and feelings.

    Read the full story here, including...

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  • In conjunction with Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Dartmouth College will be hosting a two-panel Asian American studies symposium on Wednesday, May 17 and Friday, May 19, 2017.

    "Trans-Pacific Imaginaries: Entanglements and Embodiments of Diaspora in Asian American Studies"

    This symposium interrogates Asian/American studies to conceptualize immigration beyond a literal migration of bodies across borders. The panelists analyze how labor markets, cultural productions,...

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