News & Events

  • In his thesis, "More Black Ivy Leaguers, but There's a 'Kind'?  Oppositional Culture Theory and Group Attachment in High-Achieving Black Students", Georgino considered the observation that more Black students are enrolling in elite colleges and universities, and Black immigrants and the children of Black immigrants have largely bolstered the increasing numbers. The thesis focuses on the application of John Ogbu's Oppositional Culture Theory, which posits that the African American...

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  • Jaclyn Wypler's senior thesis, The Future’s In the Dirt: Local Food, Community and Embeddedness in Hardwick, VT, examined an emerging local food system in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont using the theory of embeddedness. Through interviews, a website content analysis, and participant observation, she investigated the ways in which the local food producers actively constructed social and economically embedded relationships with three broad groups: 1) other local producers...

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  • In an article on the Student Research Symposium, sponsored by the President's Office, The Dartmouth highlighted the work of sociology major Emi Weed '13:

    The Dartmouth states:

    Emi Weed '13, a sociology major, examined the nature of hookups, romantic relationships and companionate love at Dartmouth at the Undergraduate Research Symposium. Defining hookups as any casual sexual interaction and citing data that only 35 percent of college students hook up, Weed...

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  • In her senior honors thesis, completed under the guidance of Professor John Campbell, Orli Kleiner '12 conducted an economic sociological analysis of advertisements of Boston Red Sox-New York Yankees games throughout the twentieth century.  Using qualitative and quantitative methods and a compiled collection of primary sources that did not previously exist, Orli analyzed and compared the history and evolution of baseball advertisements to that of consumer goods, observing...

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  • Susan J. Boutwell

    Visit the Strategic Planning website for the most current “Leading Voices in Higher Education” information and schedule.

    Sociologist Jonathan Cole is the next speaker in the “...

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  • Bonnie Barber

    Faculty members share their insights on current events with Dartmouth Now in a question-and-answer series called Faculty Forum. This week, Professor Denise Anthony talks about the issues surrounding electronic medical records.

    Denise Anthony is an associate professor and past chair in the department of Sociology. She is also research director of the Institute for Security, Technology, and Society (...

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  • Bonnie Barber

    If you are Asian American, could living in ethnic neighborhoods with other Asian Americans be better for your health? The answer is yes, according to Dartmouth Assistant Professor of Sociology Emily Walton, who recently published her findings in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

    Walton examined 256 neighborhoods in large...

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  • Dartmouth’s Marc Dixon, an associate professor of sociology, is part of a VPR Vermont Edition in-depth discussion that explores the idea of how the middle class is defined in America.

    “It’s a loose term,” Dixon tells VPR. “So often in popular usage we are just talking about a way of life. It is almost a standing category for mainstream mid-America life that might include owning a home, having a more or less stable job, and if you didn’t go...

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  • Denise Anthony, associate professor of sociology and research director of the Institute for Security, Technology, and Society at Dartmouth, says that Facebook’s new privacy controls and a proposal to change the 1986 Electronic Communications Privacy Act are both positive steps in protecting online privacy. However, more actions are needed, writes Anthony in her CNN opinion piece...

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  • Keith Chapman

    Twenty-three scholars—from a variety of disciplines that include biology, Native American studies, and sociology—have joined the ranks of Dartmouth’s Arts & Sciences faculty this academic year. In this weeklong series, Dartmouth Now takes a closer look at some of these scholars, their research, and what brought them to Dartmouth.

    Emily Walton, assistant professor of sociology,...

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