News & Events

  • On February 2nd, faculty and staff members from Dartmouth and beyond gathered at the Rockefeller Center to discuss the current research of Janice M. McCabe, an Assistant Professor of Sociology whose area of expertise includes gender, education, and youth studies. With a focus in research that investigates youth culture and social networks, Janice McCabe recently completed a manuscript tentatively titled, "Friends with Academic Benefits: Networks Matter During and After College." Andrew...

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  • Religion and Political Economy
    Sociology 49.17

    Dist:  SOC; WCult: W.

    2 hour with Prof. Henry Clark

    What is religion’s role in the wealth and poverty of nations? Is there really a “Protestant ethic” and a “spirit of capitalism?” Or is human prosperity completely independent of religious belief, institutions, and “spirit”? How do Western and non-Western societies seeking their place in the modern world reconcile religious traditions with the demands...

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  • In a new spring-term course, Dartmouth students will investigate questions of race, inequality, and violence that arose last summer following the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo.

    Read...

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  • There’s no denying that Valentine’s Day can be complicated. But not to worry: Dartmouth Now has canvassed faculty from across the divisions—a sociologist, a biologist, and an art historian—to find interdisciplinary answers to the age-old questions of dating, romance, and, of course, the mating habits of reptiles.

    ...

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  • Piles of research link foreclosure to depression, increased emergency room visits and even suicide among people who have lost their homes or are close to it. But just as foreclosures can contribute to health problems, new research shows that health problems can contribute to foreclosure, as well.

    Middle-aged adults with chronic conditions that got worse as they grew older are nearly twice as likely to default on their mortgages and 2.6 times as likely to lapse into foreclosure than...

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  • People who develop a debilitating or chronic illness could be at least twice as likely to default on their homes or risk foreclosure, a recent U.S. study suggests.

    Most research on links between financial troubles and illness has focused on poverty or declining income as a cause of poor health, rather than the other way around, the study team notes.

    Read the full story,...

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  • New from Bloomsbury Press (April 2015 USA)

    "The World of States"

    by John L. Campbell & John A. Hall
     

    Globalization has affected the way that the state is seen by the public and academics. Some say that the state has lost it powers, outflanked from above by economic change and from below by the rise of regional and nationalist movements. More common is the view that states have detrimental effects on the development of economies and societies....

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  • Since 2010, Credit Suisse has sponsored an annual survey offering insight into the values and aspirations of young people in Switzerland, Brazil, Singapore and the United States. Assistant Professor Janice McCabe shares her take on Credit Suisse’s Youth Barometer 2014 survey results in the US in an interview with Alice Bordoloi:

    ...

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  • Neukom Fellows are interdisciplinary positions for recent Ph.D.s, DMAs, or MFAs whose research interests or practice cuts across traditional disciplinary boundaries, but has some computational component, whether it be a framing concept for intellectual exploration or an explicit component of the work that is pursued.  Please read here for more detailed information about this program.

  • According to new research by Assistant Professor Jason Houle, more than a third of today’s young Americans (age 24 to 28) have more debt than assets, reports The Wall Street Journal. “That’s roughly double the proportion of their peers in the late 1980s and mid-1970s,” notes the newspaper.

    Houle examined how the type of debt carried by young Americans has changed since the 1970s. Houle, as assistant professor of...

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