News & Events

  • The US has the highest percentage of obese children and young adults in the world. In a recent Op Ed in the Garnet News, Sociology professor Kathryn Lively argues that in addition to individual choices and structural features of of urbanization, poor diets, and reduced physical activity, there is another component that has contributed to this epidemic: our culture. Read the full article here...

  • In a recent article in the New Hampshire Journal, Sociology Professor Kathryn Lively discusses her research on women and work-life balance in the NH State Legislature. Read the full article here...

  • Dartmouth’s house communities were launched last year to increase students’ sense of continuity in their residential experience, provide more opportunities for them to interact with faculty and staff beyond the classroom, and build community. First-year students are assigned to one of six communities when they matriculate, and remain affiliated with that community throughout their undergraduate careers. Six professors, plus a seventh for the Living Learning communities, live in single-family...

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  • The Department of Sociology invites applications for a tenured (Associate/Full) or tenurable (Advanced Assistant) full-time appointment beginning fall 2018.  The position is open to sociologists with a PhD in any area of the discipline.  Special consideration will be given to candidates who build on existing strengths in the department.  We will begin reviewing applications on September 15, 2017, until the position is filled.  The position is contingent on funding approval. 

    Dartmouth...

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  • In this interview, Jason Houle addresses such topics as (1) is there really a student loan crisis, (2) is student loan debt distributed equally across various social groups, (3) by how much has average student loan increased, (4) is education a good investment, (5) how does loan repayment compare across social groups, (6) how could society restructure the education system to alleviate the student loan debt situation, (7) is this just a matter of millenials taking more work hours while in...

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  •  “This fine book shreds the dominant narratives about the Islamic Republic as Parsa analyzes the titanic struggle under way in Iran between theocracy and democracy. Along the way, the author shows why gradual reform—the leitmotif for Western supporters of ‘pragmatic’ Iranian president Hassan Rouhani and of the Obama administration’s nuclear deal—is unlikely. Parsa digs deep into Persian primary material often ignored in Washington policy discussions, intelligence analysis and journalism. He...

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  • June 22-24, 2017 • Dartmouth College • Hanover, New Hampshire

    Affect control theory (ACT) examines how sentiment norms – our culturally shared meanings for particular types of actors, behaviors, emotions, and social settings – organize social life and direct us toward a mutual interpretive framework for interaction.  To find out more about this conference content and schedule, read here.

  • Developing their skill at perspective-taking, along with building students’ “sociological imaginations,” a concept described by 20th century sociologist C. Wright Mills, are two of the main objectives of "Introductory Sociology." Along with in-class games and weekly reflections, assignments in Kim Rogers' course ask students to investigate areas where their personal identities overlap with social dynamics.  Read the full story about "Doing Sociology"...

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  • Kalpona Akter, who started stitching at age 12 for $6 a month in a Bangladesh sweat shop, is now, at 40, a global activist for reform in her nation’s garment industry. She related her life trajectory in a series of sometimes emotional talks to Dartmouth College students, faculty and the public.  Read the full story here.

  • Misagh Parsa, a professor of sociology at Dartmouth College, outlined the roots of a deep discord between the Iranian people and their Islamist government and pointed to possible outcomes during a recent talk at the Haldeman Center. The discussion came within days of a convincing victory from Hassan Rouhani, a moderate reformer, in the country’s presidential election and also coincides with the publication of Parsa’s latest book, Democracy in Iran: Why It Failed and How It Might Succeed...

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