Kristin E. Smith

|Visiting Associate Professor
Academic Appointments

Visiting Associate Professor of Sociology

Kristin Smith’s research focus is on gender inequality, labor markets and employment, and work and family policy. She has researched labor force issues, including gender differences in job tenure and shifting determinants of women’s labor supply and the consequences of those shifts. In addition, Smith has studied occupational variation in earnings, job retention and job flexibility, principally focused on care workers and more recently on STEM workers. Smith also studies family policy, including paid family and medical leave, examining inequity in access and impacts on labor supply decisions. Smith’s expertise lies in examining trends in how work and family life interconnect, developing workforce policy recommendations, and applying a gender lens to her analysis. She has a broad background in demography and sociology, has extensive experience in survey design and implementation, and is proficient at quantitative data analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal data.

Contact

Blunt 301B
HB 6104

Education

  • B.A. University of Vermont 1989
  • M.P.H. Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine 1993
  • Masters Certificate in Project Management, Georgetown University 2001
  • Ph.D. University of Maryland 2006

Selected Publications

  • Sassler, S., K. Michelmore, and K. Smith. 2017. “A Tale of Two Majors: Explaining the Gender Gap in STEM Employment Among Computer Science and Engineering Degree Holders.” Social Sciences, 6(3): 69. doi:10.3390/socsci6030069  

  • Smith, K. E. (2017). Changing gender roles and rural poverty. In A. Tickamyer, J. Sherman, & J. Warlick (Eds.), Rural Poverty in the U.S.A.. New York: Columbia University Press.

  • Smith, K. 2015. “Family Income Composition.” In Robert Scott and Stephen Kosslyn (eds.) Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, Wiley Publishing.

  • Smith, K. E., & Mattingly, M. J. (2014). Husbands' job loss and wives' labor force participation during economic downturns: are all recessions the same?. MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW. Retrieved from http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/

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Selected Works & Activities